The Tree That Grows 40 Different Fruit

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The Tree That Grows 40 Different Fruit
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In an ongoing series on hybridizing fruit trees, Syracuse University sculptor Sam Van Aken's Tree of 40 Fruit is true to its name. Most of the year, it looks pretty ordinary, but in the spring, the tree blossoms display various tones of pink, crimson, and white. Then, from July through October, it bears 40 different types of stone fruit, including almonds, apricots, cherries, nectarines, peaches, and plums.

The feat is accomplished by grafting together several different varieties, including native fruit, heirlooms, and antiques, some of which are centuries-old, Aken tells Epicurious.

Why Did Mars Die?

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Why Did Mars Die?
Via: New Yorker
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There once were two planets, new to the galaxy and inexperienced in life. Like fraternal twins, they were born at the same time, about four and a half billion years ago, and took roughly the same shape. Both were blistered with volcanoes and etched with watercourses; both circled the same yellow dwarf star—close enough to be warmed by it, but not so close as to be blasted to a cinder. Had an alien astronomer swivelled his telescope toward them in those days, he might have found them equally promising—nurseries in the making. They were large enough to hold their gases close, swaddling themselves in atmosphere; small enough to stay solid, never swelling into gaseous giants. They were "Goldilocks planets," our own astronomers would say: just right for life.

Meet the Fastest Bird

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Meet the Fastest Bird
Via: MNN
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It's everyone's favorite question when it comes to record-setting birds: which is the fastest? The peregrine falcon has taken the trophy for fastest, reaching an incredible 242 mph on a high-speed dive. The much larger golden eagle is not far behind with a maximum dive speed of 200 mph. However, this is on a dive, when gravity is certainly helping the bird reach such mind-blowing speeds.

Click here for more mind blowing birds.

These Are Actual Scans of Woolly Mammoth Babies!

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These Are Actual Scans of Woolly Mammoth Babies!
Via: PBS
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First of their kind scans of preserved infant woolly mammoths have made the insight into the early stages of development for the 40,000 year-old prehistoric animals less fuzzy.

According to a report published July 8 in the Journal of Paleontology, researchers performed a full body CT scan of two mammoth newborns, named Lyuba and Khroma, who died at the ages of 1 and 2 months respectively. The skeletal structures of the infants, which researchers consider to be the most well-preserved baby mammoth specimens found to date, gave the scientists the chance to document the various changes that occurred to the body as the ancient pachyderms grew. They also helped determine whether the mammoth gestation periods may have been shorter than that of modern elephants.