This Guy's 1000 Watt Flashlight is Friggin Ridiculous

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I don't know what he's going to do with this besides blind everyone he knows, but it sure is bright!

Science of The Day: Coyotes and Wolves Are Mating to Create The 'Coywolf'

Science of The Day: Coyotes and Wolves Are Mating to Create The 'Coywolf'
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There a new species emerging right before scientist's eyes. And this doesn't happen very often.

Because of a lack of other wolves to mate with, scientists believe they are mating with coyotes and dogs to create an entirely new species: the coywolf.

The number of coywolf has grown into the millions in northeastern North America during the last century.

According to The Economist:

The mixing of genes that has created the coywolf has been more rapid, pervasive and transformational than many once thought. Javier Monzón, who worked until recently at Stony Brook University in New York state (he is now at Pepperdine University, in California) studied the genetic make-up of 437 of the animals, in ten north-eastern states plus Ontario. He worked out that, though coyote DNA dominates, a tenth of the average coywolf's genetic material is dog and a quarter is wolf.

The DNA from both wolves and dogs (the latter mostly large breeds, like Doberman Pinschers and German Shepherds), brings big advantages, says Dr Kays. At 25kg or more, many coywolves have twice the heft of purebred coyotes. With larger jaws, more muscle and faster legs, individual coywolves can take down small deer. A pack of them can even kill a moose.

Basically the combination of wolf, coyote and dog DNA has created super fast killing machines.

Hold your children close, America.

History of The Day: Rare Photo of 'The World's Most Loyal Dog' Emerges

History of The Day: Rare Photo of 'The World's Most Loyal Dog' Emerge
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A rare photo of Hachiko, the Japanese Akita dog know as the "World's Most Loyal Dog," has emerged 80 years after his death.

The story of Hachiko and his owner Uneo dates back to 1920's Tokyo, where it is said Hachiko would wait every day at the train station for Uneo to arrive back home from work.

This happened every day, until 1925 when Uneo unexpectedly died while at work.

Hachiko couldn't understand that his owner had died, so he stood watch at the train station for 10 years until his death in 1935.

Most photos of Hachiko (like the one above) only show him standing alone, but the new photo shows his surroundings.

The photo shows the dog blending in naturally at the station, and is totally different from other memorial and closeup photos.

When Hachiko is pictured alone, the environment around the dog is unclear. Almost all shots of the dog with people were taken as memorial photos.

The photo found recently was taken around 1934 by the late Isamu Yamamoto, a former bank employee who lived in the Sarugakucho district in Shibuya Ward, Tokyo. That year, the first statue of the dog was erected in front of the station and Hachiko attracted public attention as a faithful dog.

Hachiko is a true icon, receiving tributes and statues across Japan.

Good boy, Hachiko. Good boy.